Reports

Hanoi Safety Analysis Report

Strengthening Sustainable Urban Transport Safetipin in collaboration with the Asian Development Bank Youth for Asia (ADB YfA), a youth initiative aimed at increasing meaningful youth contribution, and AIESEC Viet Nam, a youth led NGO that develops youth leadership - undertook a pilot project for strengthening sustainable urban transport for Hanoi Metro Line 3. The project primarily engages youth to collect gender sensitive safety audits by using both the Safetipin Applications named ‘My Safetipin’ and ‘Safetipin Nite’.   Hanoi Metro Line 3 The country's first metro system consisting of 8 lines to provide connectivity to urban and suburban areas of Hanoi are currently under construction - Line 2A: Cat Linh to Ha Dong and Line 3: Nhon to Hanoi Station - the latter being our project scope. After facing long delays of almost ten years, the elevated section of Line 3 is nearing completion in 2020. Starting the same year, the city wants to slowly phase out bikes and encourage people to use public transport. To enable this paradigm shift, the soon operational metro line is trying to strengthen the last mile connectivity around the stations and focus on safety, accessibility, and mobility for all. Safetipin was brought in to help assess the quality of the urban areas around each station and to give recommendations for improvement which will specifically benefit women and girls and allow them to use public transport with ease – increased access, last mile connectivity and freedom of movement being the primary objectives for the pilot project.   Safety Audits of Hanoi Metro Line 3 Parameter Rating - Pin Distribution Graph: The parameter wise pin distribution graph illustrates the number of points rated as 0, 1, 2 and 3. The good ratings are taken as positive and poor ratings as negative. As shown on the graph, the parameter of Security is rated poorly for most parts of the city, whereas parameters like Walkpath, Lighting and Gender Diversity is mostly good through out the city.   Average Parameter Rating Graph: The average parameter rating graph illustrates the average rating for each parameter on a scale of three. Each of the nine parameters are rated either 0,1, 2 or 3, where 0 is poor and 3 is good. As seen on the graph, Walkpath parameter has been rated the highest, followed by other parameters such as Lighting and Gender Usage. Openness, Visibility and Transport parameters are rated slightly lower and the parameter Security has been rated the lowest, which probably indicates no or little presence of formal security in public spaces. However, the overall Feeling of Safety or perception of safety for Hanoi is rated Average.   Correlation Graph (Parameter w/t Feeling): The correlation graph illustrates the correlation drawn between each of the eight parameters with respect to feeling, the ninth parameter. In the case of Hanoi, the manual data collected shows openness, walkpath, security and lighting to be rated the highest when correlated with feeling. This clearly shows the importance of these parameters in contributing to the perception of safety.   Hanoi Metro Line 3 Safety Score 4.1/5 Basing on the collected data a safety score of 4.1 on a scale of 5 is given for the entire Hanoi Metro Line 3 (please refer Safetipin methodology on page 00). The percentage distribution on this scale shows 84% of the overall rating based on all the nine parameters, to be good. The rest is distributed from above average to poor, where 6% is above average and the remaining 10% is further divided between average, below average, poor.   The following parameter maps illustrate the pin location and rating received by each pin for each parameter. When viewed together it shows predominantly how areas fair based on the ratings. For example, if the safety score map on the left is viewed at a glance, it shows how areas from the extended or outer city fairs poorly in terms of safety score (more red, orange and yellow), compared to the transition or in-between city (mix of all the colours) which is a combination of both good and poor scores. The core or inner city however fairs very good in terms of safety scores (mostly light and dark green). What is really explains at a very basic level, is that neighbourhood which are tightly packed around the streets are safer in nature as they have more people inhabiting the streets. Such streets have more ‘eyes on the streets’ as people are working on or by them (formal shops, informal vendors) and as people are living next to them (houses and hotels) – thus making it safer for users. If physical infrastructure (adequate street lights, accessible walkpaths, seamless public transport) is improved in these neighbourhoods then it has more changes of being safe at all times of day and night compared to the neighbourhoods which lack them.   Download Full Report in PDF Click Here  

Port Moresby Safety Audit Report Safetipin

Introduction “Papua New Guinea is one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a woman, with a large number of women experiencing rape or assault in their lifetime and facing systemic discrimination.” While these are criminal offences, domestic violence was specifically proscribed under the 2013 Family Protection Act (FPA), very few perpetrators are brought to justice.1 In a 2011 scoping study conducted by UN Women show 55% of women and girls studied reported that they have experienced some form of violence in the market; and 22% have experienced more than one incident of sexual violence in the market.2 Women and girls in Papua New Guinea face formidable barriers to overcoming poverty and social in-justice. They are severely disadvantaged in all areas of human development including education, work, health care etc. and are largely absent from political participation, market engagement, collective action and educational achievement. PNG ranked 157th out of 197 countries in Gender Development Index.3 Public spaces like market area and public transportation i.e. the buses and taxis are the most unsafe for women in Port Moresby. These places are where most cases of physical violence and sexual harassment are reported. Young, unemployed males and men under the influence of drugs and alcohol are the most common perpetrators of physical violence and sexual harassment. The Port Moresby Safe City Programme which was launched in 2011 partnered with National Capital District Commission (NCDC) and Royal PNG Police Constabulary (RPNGC) to make public spaces safe, especially for women and girls. The Programme aims to improve institutional support, capacity building, advocacy and the provision of gender-sensitive infrastructure to address women’s and girl’s mobility and safety in and around markets and public transport. It was found that women and girls experience a high degree of violence and harassment at bus stops, on PMVs and in taxis. They do not feel confident to report their experiences of violence or harassment to the police, and overall there is an inadequate response by police to reported incidents of violence and harassment. Notable results from the UN Women Safe Market and Safe Public Transport Programme include redevelopment of market infrastructure and provision of womenonly bus service. This improved safety of women and girls in market place and on public transportation to some extent. The female respondents agreed that removal of betel nut and cigarette vendors from the market somewhat made them less likely to experience violence and harassment, compared to before but they also noted significant loss of income due to a reduction of customers. Further cashless payments were introduced to prevent women vendors from being robbed. Amenities were also provided for women vendors such as bathrooms and showers, renovated market stalls and shaded areas, potable water as well as set-ting up a market vendor association and a referral system for survivors of family and sexual violence in the markets. The women only bus service also ensured safe public transport for more than 100000 women and girls of Port Moresby. However, women and girls’ experiences of violence and harassment have not entirely disappeared; many vendors and buyers reported that they continue to experience inappropriate touching, whistling, sexual comments, and leering, by both young men hanging around inside the Gordons market and security guards. The qualitative analysis report of Gordons, Koki and Gerehu market & transport service conducted by The Equality Institute, Australia has determined that in all the three marketplaces as well as the PMVs i.e. the buses and taxis, women and girls continue to experience a high degree of physical and sexual violence and sexual harassment. Women and girls most commonly experience pickpocketing; bag snatching; physical assault; extortion; verbal abuse; intimidation; inappropriate touching; and leering, whistling and teasing. Some horrifying responses were: “Majority of female vendors face theft every day. Money or good are taken from them under threat. These perpetrators usually use (threats) to get what they want.” (Young Female Vendor, FGD)4  “Sexual violence happens both in the bus and on the bus stop. As discussed, common practice noticeably sighted included touching of private bodily areas, giggling, whistling, applying bodily signs to attract opposite sex, on taxis as told it’s not safe for both sex travelling alone both having the day as well in the night. We can be victimized by the drivers. In most cases related to rape of women. This as well applies to PMV buses.” (Male KII Participant).5 To avoid such violence and harassment, some respondents suggested that women should dress modestly, and should avoid the markets at certain times of the day, or travel with a male relative. Such suggestions highlight the pervasiveness of victim-blaming attitudes and the considerable restraints placed on women’s mobility. 6 All this provides the context and framework to conduct a city-wide safety audit mapping to understand the nature and causes of vulnerability in the city in order to design programs and policies that will address these effectively and sustainably.   1.1 Mapping Port Moresby using Safetipin technology  Under the Port Moresby Safe Cities and Safe Public Spaces Global Program, Safetipin has been engaged to build capacity of local authorities to use smart phone solutions in making Port Moresby safe for women and others. The study seeks to map key concerns of women’s safety and security in the city of Port Moresby with focus on sexual violence in public space. This project will work towards fulfilling the aims and goals of the Safe Cities Program. Safetipin is an app and technology platform developed in India in 2013 as a tool to measure safety and the lack of it for women and girls in public spaces in cities. It uses the methodology of the safety audit as a tool to assess public spaces (Refer to Annex 1). The Safetipin technology platform has two apps that has been used in the project – My Safetipin, a crowdsourced tech platform that will be used by volunteers to give data and Safetipin Nite, a tool to collect night time pictures of the city. Safetipin apps has been used to map the Port Moresby to assess public spaces for safety, both on infrastructure as well as social usage. The data has delineated why certain spaces are vulnerable by assessing infrastructural parameters as well as social usage by measuring women’s feelings of safety at different places around the city. The collected data has been analysed in this report and can used for actual on-ground responses and actions that will work towards improving safety for citizens on the streets and public spaces.     Download Full Report in PDF Click Here

Choloma Safety Audit Report Safetipin

Introduction According to the Honduras 2015 Crime and Safety report, Honduras has one of the highest murder rates in the world. Incidents of extortion, harassment and abduction are not uncommon in cities of Honduras where the women and children are most vulnerable to such incidents of violence. Most of the major cities of Honduras has higher homicide rates than the national average1 . Public spaces and public transportation i.e. the buses and taxis are considered as unsafe for women in Honduras. This fear of violence in public spaces affects the everyday lives of women as it restricts their movement and freedom to exert their right as citizens of the city – freedom to move, study, work, and spend leisure time.   Creating a safe environment involves much more than just responding to violence. It is important to create the conditions by which women are able to move about safely and without fear of violence or assault. Fear often plays a key role in women's experience and access to the city. Therefore, in order to create greater levels of safety and comfort, both actual violence and the fear of violence need to be addressed. Research has shown that many factors play a role in determining women’s access to the city, including urban design and planning, community involvement, improved policing, and usage of space. The question was how to gather that information to build safer cities.   Safetipin Technology Safetipin, is a map-based mobile application and online platform, which works to make communities and cities safer by providing safety-related information collected by users and night time photographs. It uses the methodology of the safety audit as a tool to assess public spaces and perception of safety in those public spaces. The safety audits measures several parameters including infrastructure and the social usage of the space. The safety audit measures factors like lighting, signage, presence of people, presence of security, natural surveillance, maintenance of the place, the state of the sidewalk. Additionally, safety audits identify possible actions for change and build public awareness, ownership and commitment to implementing these actions at both the local and policy levels.   The Safetipin technology platform has two apps – My Safetipin, a crowd sourced tech platform that is used by volunteers and citizens to give data about their city and Safetipin Nite, a tool to collect night time pictures of the city. For this project, data has been collected through My Safetipin app only.   Project For this project, Choloma Municipality was selected as the pilot as it’s one of the most unsafe cities of Honduras. Choloma Municipality is part of Cortes, one of the 18 Departments of Honduras. As seen in the Map 1, Choloma Municipality has 41 administrative divisions or localities. The key stakeholders for this project are the Municipality of Choloma, UN Women, UNDP, UNICEF, and local organizations. My Safetipin app has been used to assess public spaces in Choloma for safety, both on infrastructure as well as social usage. The data has delineated why certain spaces are vulnerable by assessing infrastructural parameters as well as social usage by measuring women’s feelings of safety at different places around the city. The collected data has been analysed in this report, and can used for actual on-ground responses and actions that will work towardsimproving safety for citizens on the streets and public spaces.   Objectives: The two key objectives for this project are: 1. Capacity Building training of local organizations in Choloma A two-day capacity building program with key stakeholders on how to use the app, how to analyze data for public policy and to develop an understanding of public spaces and violence against women. A training will also be held with volunteers on how to use the My Safetipin app. 2. Data Integration at the Local level The data collected to be analyzed by the Safetipin team and made available through GIS layers maps, reports, tables and other formats. The raw data will also be made available to All the data collected at the local level will be integrated into the app platform and will be available both for analysis as well as visible on the app for usage by all citizens to understand safety concerns and make safer decisions while using public spaces. Download Full Report in PDF Click Here  

Panchkula Safety Analysis Report

Safetipin is a map-based mobile phone and online application, which works to make communities and cities safer by providing safety-related information collected by users and by trained auditors. At the core of the app is the Safety Audit. A Safety Audit is a participatory tool for collecting and assessing information about perceptions of safety in public spaces. The audit is based on nine parameters – Lighting, Openness, Visibility, Crowd, Security, Walkpath, Availability of Public Transport, Gender Diversity and Feeling.   Methodology The safety audits have been generated using two methods. First, manual audits were conducted using My Safetipin app. Secondly, safety audits have been generated using the Safetipin Nite app. The assessment was done post-sunset till 10 pm. Mobile phones were mounted on the windshield of the taxis’, and using the app photographs of the city roads were taken. These photographs were then assessed based on the eight audit parameters to generate audit pins at each location.   A total of 1,724 audits have been generated, of which 1246 audits are within Panchkula Urban Complex. Over 160 km of road length has been covered in this project. Overall, the Safety Score for Panchkula is rated 2.5/5 i.e. Average.   Safety Score The Safety Score of a point is a reflection of the perception of safety at that particular location. For each audit point, it is a number between 0 and 5, 0 being Poor i.e. Very Unsafe and 5 being Excellent in terms of overall safety. Indicated in the pie chart is the percentage distribution of pins in each range. 39% of the audit points were rated poorly i.e. safety score less than 2/5. As seen in the Safety Score Map, these points are mostly located around Mansadevi Complex and sectors lying on the right side of Ghaggar river (Sectors 23 to 30). Parameter Ratings Each of the nine parameters is rated 0/1/2/3, 0 being the poorest and 3 good. The average parameter rating graph indicates the overall average rating for each parameter. As seen in the graph, the Openness parameter has been rated the highest and is followed by other parameters of the walk path and lighting. This can be attributed to the grid planning of the city which has laid down space for wide roads and infrastructure. The crowd, Gender Usage, and Visibility parameters are the least rated parameters, indicating less number of pedestrians after sunset and women’s participation in public spaces is poor. Security parameter has not been assessed completely due to lack of information, hence rated low. The overall feeling of Safety for the city of Panchkula is rated Below Average.   Download Full Report in PDF Click Here 

WOMEN AND TRANSPORT IN INDIAN CITIES

Ultimately, transportation is the fulcrum that allows women to participate in the workforce; a societal shift to transform the entire world economy.” – Sonal Shah, Senior Manager, ITDP India Programme    Centred around this idea, ITDP and Safetipin have released a policy brief on Women and Transport in Indian Cities. The draft was released on 13 June 2017 at a roundtable discussion on Gender and Transit, organized by ITDP, Safetipin and UN Women with participation from 30 women’s groups, international organizations, professionals and academic institutions. A roundtable discussion on Gender and Transit was organized by ITDP, Safetipin and UN Women with participation from 30 women’s groups, international organizations, professionals and academic institutions The coming decade will be a defining moment for India as its urban areas are estimated to constitute around 40 per cent or 600 million of its total population by 2030. According to the High Powered Executive Committee (HPEC), around INR 23 lakh crores is required over 2015–2030 for India’s urban transport infrastructure. The national government has initiated missions and schemes to invest in urban transport and infrastructure; and created indicators and service level benchmarks to establish a city’s baseline and goal for improvement. The recently announced Green Urban Mobility Scheme (GUMS) expects to invest around INR 70,000 crores over 2018–2023 on sustainable transport. “The defining characteristic of violence against women is its normalization and ordinary and continuous nature.” – Kalpana Viswanath, Co-founder & CEO, Safetipin   While there is momentum by different levels of government in addressing women’s safety in public transport, urban transport investments are largely gender blind with a limited understanding of the interrelationships between gender and transport. Sustainable urban development will remain elusive without integrating women and girls in urban transport. Women and girls are close to 50 per cent of our urban population. They comprise only 19 per cent of “other workers”, 84 per cent of their trips are by public, intermediate public and non-motorized modes of transport (Census 2011)[2]. While 73 per cent of trips by “other workers” in urban areas are by sustainable modes of transport, women and girls’ share is only 14 per cent. Ultimately transportation will help women access economic and social opportunities. In the next few years, cities will need to make a concerted effort to improve women and girls’ experience of sustainable modes of transport to achieve a target of 40 per cent of all trips. The policy brief fills this gap by providing a framework to integrate technical and social, quantitative and qualitative approaches for enabling this transition. In Section 1, the brief underscores the need for a policy brief focusing on women and transport in Indian cities. Section 2 describes the scope of the brief. The gendered dimensions of urban transport are covered in Section 3, with a focus on trip chaining and purpose, modal shares, trip distances, time poverty, sexual harassment and employment in the transport sector.  Section 4 proposes urban transport indicators and service level benchmarks for comprehensive mobility plans. Recommendations to improve women’s modal shares and experiences of walking, cycling, public and intermediate public transport, and engendering public transport authorities, are highlighted in Section 5.  Since urban transport is not the responsibility of one ministry or department, gender inclusion will require interventions at multiple scales and coordination with a number of ministries and departments. Section 6 identifies such ministries and departments and their potential role in mainstreaming gender. Women’s access and use of urban transportation will play a key role in achieving India’s sustainable development goals (SDGs) and ensure women’s right to the city and its public spaces. To quote Shreya Gadepalli, who leads the ITDP India Programme, “When we create cities – their public spaces and transport systems – that are responsive to the needs of women, children and the elderly, they become great cities for all!”    Download the policy brief here.

Nairobi Safety Analysis Report

Safetipin, in partnership with the Nairobi City County, conducted safety audits in city of Nairobi supported by UN Habitat and Cities Alliance.  Safetipin, is a map-based mobile phone and online application, which works to make communities and cities safer by providing safetyrelated information collected by users and by trained auditors. At the core of the app is the Women’s Safety Audit. A Women’s Safety Audit (WSA) is a participatory tool for collecting and assessing information about perceptions of urban safety in public spaces. The audit is based on nine parameters – Lighting, Openness, Visibility, Crowd, Security, Walkpath, Availability of Public Transport, Gender Diversity and Feeling. The safety audits have been generated using two methods. First, manual audits were conducted by volunteers using the My Safetipin app at night. A total of 4,956 manual audits were conducted. Secondly, safety audits have been generated using the Safetipin Nite app. Uber taxis and local taxis of Nairobi were hired for this purpose. Mobile phones were mounted on the windshield and using the app photographs of the city roads were taken. These photographs were then assessed based on the eight audit parameters to generate audit pins at each location. A total of 11,807 audit pins have been generated over 685 km of road length.   Safety Score The Safety Score of a point is a reflection of the perception of safety at that particular location. For each audit point it is a number between 0 and 5, 0 being Poor i.e. Very Unsafe and 5 being Excellent in terms of overall safety. The overall Safety Score for city of Nairobi is 3.1/5 i.e. Good. Indicated in the pie chart is the percentage distribution of pins in each range. The Safety Score has also been indicated in the map below. Around 43% of the audit points were found to be safe whereas 22% of the points were rated poorly and needs improvement. The parameters’ co-relation with the feeling of safety is indicated in the co-relation graph. From the manual safety audits, the parameters of Lighting, Openness and Gender Usage were found to contribute the most to the feeling of safety. Parameter Ratings Each of the nine parameters is rated 0/1/2/3, 0 being the poorest and 3 good. The average parameter ratings graph indicates the overall average rating for each parameter. Openness has been rated Above Average. Walkpath, Lighting and Public Transport have been rated Average. Visibility, Crowd, Security and Gender Usage have been rated Below Average. The overall Feeling of Safety for Nairobi City has been rated as Average. The Parameter wise pin distribution graph indicates the number of points rated 0/1/2/3 i.e. the good points as positive and poor ratings as negative. The parameters of Security and Gender Usage have been rated poorly for most parts of the city followed by Visibility and Crowd. Lighting and Public Transport needs to be improved in some locations and the Walkpath conditions needs to be improved in few locations. The Impact Bar Graph indicates the extent of influence and the relative impact that each parameter has on the perception of safety. Different parameters have different levels of impact on the perception of safety. The combined length indicates the impact potential of the parameter. The parameters with the maximum combined length have the highest impact on the perception of safety and vice versa i.e. The audits indicate that for Nairobi City, Lighting has the maximum impact and Transportation the least. The positive length (in green) indicates the extent of provision that has already been made on ground. The negative length (in red) indicates the (remaining) amount of improvement needed. Gender Usage and Crowd are derived parameters i.e. improving the other parameters will result in a location being safer and hence more people, especially women using it at night. As seen from the bar graph Lighting, Visibility and Security parameters need to be improved followed by the Walkpath. Parameter-wise pin distribution maps can be seen on the following pages. Download Full Report in PDF Click Here

Delhi Safety Analysis Report

Delhi, or the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, is a city and Union Territory of India. It is also one of the five mega cities of India i.e. it has a population of more than 10 million. Having an average density of 225pph the city spans over 1483 square kilometers. Along with huge socio-economic development the city has also gained the title of “Rape Capital’ of India owing to the high rate of crimes especially those against women and girls. According to the National Crime Records Bureau’s Crime in India 2015 statistics, Delhi is the second most unsafe city in India with a crime rate of 1066.2. Of the five mega cities, Delhi has the highest rate of crimes registered under murder, rape and insulting the modesty of women. This perception of Delhi affects the how and to what extent women access public space. To assess the perception of safety at night by women, safety audits were conducted throughout the city using the Safetipin apps. Safetipin, is a map-based mobile phone and online application, which works to make communities and cities safer by providing safety-related information collected by users and by trained auditors. At the core of the app is the Women’s Safety Audit. A Women’s Safety Audit (WSA) is a participatory tool for collecting and assessing information about perceptions of urban safety in public spaces. The audit is based on nine parameters – Lighting, Openness, Visibility, Crowd, Security, Walkpath, Availability of Public Transport, Gender Diversity and Feeling. Each parameter is rated 0/1/2/3 with 0 being Poor rating and 3 being Good. All parameters except Feeling are completely objective and are rated on the basis of a well defined rubric. Based on the ratings for each of the parameters, an aggregate Safety Score is generated. The Safety Score of a point is thus a reflection of the perception of safety at that particular location. The Safety Score of a city is the aggregate of all the audit pins in it. Data was also collected using the Safetipin Nite app. This app (not available in app stores) collects photographs which are geotagged and also have time stamps. Phones with this app installed were mounted on the windshield of cars. As the car moves, photographs are continuously taken of the footpath side of the road. These photographs are then coded by a trained in-house team of professionals to generate the audits. Additional data is also recorded for the parameters of Lighting, Walkpath, Visibility, Security and Public Transport. Delhi has a Safety Score of 3.3/5. Safety audits indicate that Delhi’s Safety Score is 3.3/5. A total of 44,396 safety audits have been collected. Of these 5,296 audits were conducted by app users and 39,100 were generated using the Safetipin Nite app covering 3,910 kilometers of road length. Audits indicate that 50% of the area audited has a Safety Score of 4.0 or above. 6% of the audit locations have been given a Safety Score of less than 1.0. Another 9% of the audit points have a Safety Score ranging between 1.0 to 1.9 and 14% have a score from 2.0 to 2.9. 21% of the audit pins have a Safety Score from 3.0 to 3.9. Shown in the graph on right are the average parameter ratings for each of the nine parameters. Of the nine parameters, Security and Gender Usage have been given a poor rating. Visibility and Crowd parameters have been rated Below Average. Access to Public Transport facilities has been rated as Average. Lighting, Openness and Walkpath have been rated Above Average. The Feeling of safety has been rated as Average for the city. The stacked bar chart on the right below shows good points as positive and poor points as negative numbers. This indicates both the pin distribution of the four ratings within each parameter and also the relative performance of each parameter. In terms of jurisdiction, of the eleven Revenue Districts the North District has the lowest Safety Score of 2.6/5 and the North East District has the highest Safety Score of 3.9/5. Of the thirteen Police District, the Rohini District has the lowest rating of 2.8/5 and the North East district has the highest rating of 3.9/5. of the 70 Constituencies, Babarpur constituency ahs been rated the highest Safety Score of 4.3/5 and Bawana has the lowest Safety Score of 2.1/5. of the four Municipal Corporations, the East Delhi Municipal Corporation has the highest score of 3.6/5 and North the lowest of 3.1/5. Data analysis indicates that the parameter of Lighting has the maximum impact on the perception of safety followed by Gender Usage and Visibility. Also, each parameter has a different impact potential on the overall perception of safety. Improving the parameter with greater impact potential would result in a higher increase of the Safety Score. The Gap Impact bar on the right indicates the extent of influence and the relative impact that each parameter has on the perception of safety. The combined length indicates the impact potential of the parameter. The parameters with the maximum combined length have the highest impact on the perception of safety and vice versa i.e. Lighting has the maximum impact and Transportation the least. The positive length (in green) indicates the extent of provision that has already been made on ground. The negative length (in red) indicates the (remaining) amount of improvement needed to increase the Safety Score. The safety ratings varies largely on account of the infrastructure provision and planning typology of the area. Areas which are well lit, have proper footpaths, has access to public transportation and are active, tend to be safer. The Feeling parameter is directly impacted by the other eight parameters. Lighting, Walkpath, Security, Public Transportation and Visibility are infrastructural parameters and can be improved upon. This improvisation would result in more people especially women using public places at night.   Download Full Report in PDF Click Here    

Bogota Safety Analysis Report

Safetipin, is a map-based mobile phone and online application, which works to make communities and cities safer by providing safetyrelated information collected by users and by trained auditors. At the core of the app is the Women’s Safety Audit. A Women’s Safety Audit (WSA) is a participatory tool for collecting and assessing information about perceptions of urban safety in public spaces. The audit is based on nine parameters – Lighting, Openness, Visibility, Crowd, Security, Walkpath, Availability of Public Transport, Gender Diversity and Feeling.   Safetipin in partnership with District Secretary for Women, Bogota conducted safety audits in Bogota supported by UN Habitat and Cities Alliance.    Methodology: The safety audits were generated using two Safetipin apps i.e. My Safetipin and Safetipin Nite. The assessment was done post sunset till 10 pm. The manual audits were conducted by volunteers using the My Safetipin app. Secondly, local taxis were hired to capture night time photographs of the city’s roads. This was done by mounting mobile phones on the car’s windshield and capturing the photographs using Safetipin Nite app. These photographs were then assessed based on the audit parameters to generate audit pins at periodic intervals. In addition to taxis, smartphones were mounted on bicycles to capture the photographs of the cycle track and Walkpath.   A total of 19,351 audit pins have been generated over 1,927 km of road length. The Safety Score of Bogota was found to be 4 / 5 i.e. Good. Parameter Ratings: Each of the nine parameters is rated 0/1/2/3, 0 being the poorest and 3 good. The average parameter ratings graph indicates the overall average rating for each parameter. Walkpath and Lighting parameters have been rated the highest i.e. Good followed by Public Transport, Openness and Visibility. Security and Gender Usage are the least rated parameter i.e. Poor. The overall feeling of Safety for the city of Bogota is rated Average. Parameter-wise Pin Distribution: The Parameter wise pin distribution graph indicates the number of points rated 0/1/2/3 i.e. the good points as positive and poor ratings as negative. The parameter of Crowd, Security and Gender Usage have been rated poorly for the most parts of the city. Visibility and Public Transport needs to be improved in some parts of the city Download Full Report in PDF Click Here

The Comparative Analysis Report on Safety Audits done in Delhi Bogota Nairobi

Introduction   Urbanization is one of the key processes of social change taking place today. In 2003, the world became more than 50% urban and this is growing each year. The growth of cities has provided opportunities for education, employment, and habitation for millions of people. At the same time, growing urbanization has also exacerbated existing problems as well as thrown up new problems. These include congestion, poverty, pollution and crime among others. Urban spaces provide new opportunities for people to build their homes and lives while reinforcing existing inequalities and often creating new ones. Safety of citizens and freedom from crime and violence in cities has become a central concern with growing urbanization. Women and others such as elderly, migrants and people in low-income neighborhoods are particularly vulnerable and face safety as a major concern.  City governments and other stakeholders such as the police are responsible for providing infrastructure and services to make cities safer for everyone. Creating safe and inclusive public spaces has been recognized as important both through SDG11 as well as the New Urban Agenda. Well designed and well maintained public spaces are essential to the well-being of city inhabitants and promote sustainability as well as safety. This project ‘Using Data to build Safer Cities’ supported under the Cities Alliance Catalytic Fund has been carried out to provide reliable data to city governments to address this problem as well as suggest solutions to create safer and inclusive public spaces.  The project has been implemented in three cities across continents - Delhi (India), Bogota (Colombia) and Nairobi (Kenya). It has been carried out in partnership with Nairobi City County, District Secretary of Women, Bogota, and Government of National Capital Territory (NCT), Delhi The role of local government is crucial in addressing the safety concerns through urban management and governance. In each city, data was collected using the Safetipin apps and technology platform and shared with local stakeholders. The data has been collected with the aim of identifying key problem and areas for improvement. This report shares the findings from the data collection in all three cities as well how the data has been used by the cities to create safer and more inclusive public spaces and streets. Some of the changes recommended include designing streets to reduce opportunities for crime, improved street lighting, reorganizing markets and bus terminals, addressing last mile connectivity and encouraging community participation in designing and managing streets and public spaces.   Methodology   Safetipin is a technology platform which works to make communities and cities safer by providing safety-related information collected by users and by trained auditors. At the core of the app is the Safety Audit. A Safety Audit is a participatory tool for collecting and assessing information about perceptions of urban safety in public spaces.   The audit is based on nine parameters – Lighting, Openness, Visibility, Crowd, Security, Walkpath, Availability of Public Transport, Gender Diversity and Feeling. Each parameter is rated 0/1/2/3 with 0 being Poor rating and 3 being Good. All parameters except Feeling are completely objective and are rated on the basis of a well-defined rubric. The app is available in the app stores for free and was used by trained volunteers in collaboration with NGO partners and City Government to conduct audits. The audits were conducted post-sunset till 10 pm at night. Data was also collected using the Safetipin Nite app. This app (not available in app stores) collects photographs which are geotagged and have time stamps. Phones with this app installed were mounted on the windshield of cars. As the car moves, photographs are continuously taken of the footpath side of the road. In addition to taxis, smartphones were mounted on bicycles to capture the photographs of the cycle track in Bogota. The photographs were analyzed by a team of coders and reviewed on a daily basis to produce maps of the city.  Additional data indicating the issue (absence of streetlights, non-functioning streetlights, broken or no pavement, type of public transport) was also recorded for the parameters of Lighting, Walkpath, Visibility and Public Transport.   DELHI   Delhi, or the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, is a city and Union Territory of India. It is also one of the five mega cities of India i.e. it has a population of more than 10 million. Having an average density of 225pph the city spans over 1483 square kilometers. As per Census of India 2011, it currently has a population of 16,349,831 which makes it the most populous urban agglomeration of India and the third largest urban area in the world. The United Nations World Cities Report 2016 says that an additional 9.6million people are expected to move to Delhi by 2030.   Download Full Report in PDF Click Here  

Bengaluru A Safety Analysis Report

Safetipin is a map-based mobile phone and online application, which works to make communities and cities safer by providing safetyrelated information collected by users and by trained auditors. At the core of the app is the Safety Audit. A Safety Audit is a participatory tool for collecting and assessing information about perceptions ofsafety in public spaces. The audit is based on nine parameters – Lighting, Openness, Visibility, Crowd, Security, Walkpath, Availability of PublicTransport, Gender Diversity, and Feeling.   Methodology   The safety audits have been generated using two methods. First, manual audits were conducted by volunteers from WRI India and B-PAC using My Safetipin app.   Secondly, safety audits have been generated using the Safetipin Nite app. The assessment was done post sunset till 10 pm. Mobile phones were mounted on the windshield of the taxis’, and using the app photographs of the city roads were taken. These photographs were then assessed based on the eight audit parameters to generate audit pins at each location.   A total of 17,128 audits have been generated over 1,431 km of road length. Overall, the Safety Score for Bengaluru is rated 3.2/5 i.e. Good.   Safety Score   The Safety Score of a point is a reflection of the perception of safety at that particular location. For each audit point, it is a number between 0and 5, 0 being Poor i.e. Very Unsafe and 5 being Excellent in terms of overall safety. Indicated in the pie chart is the percentagedistribution of pins in each range. The Safety Score has also been indicated in the map below.   Parameter Ratings Each of the nine parameters is rated 0/1/2/3, 0 being the poorest and 3 good. The average parameter rating graph indicates the overallaverage rating for each parameter. Lighting parameter has been rated the highest followed by Openness, Walkpath, and Public Transport. Security and Gender Usage are the least rated parameter i.e. Poor. The overall feeling of Safety for the city of Bengaluru is rated Below Average. Parameter-wise Pin Distribution The Parameter wise pin distribution graph indicates the number of points rated 0/1/2/3 i.e. the good points as positive and poor ratings asnegative. The parameter of Security, Gender Usage, Visibility, and Crowd have been rated poorly for the most parts of the city. Lighting and accessibility to Public Transport need to be improved in some parts of the city. Download Full Report in PDF Click Here